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What Do You Mean By Attribute Agreement Analysis

Attribute analysis can be an excellent tool for detecting the causes of inaccuracies in a bug tracking system, but it must be used with great care, reflection and minimal complexity, should it ever be used. The best way to do this is to first monitor the database and then use the results of that audit to perform a targeted and optimized analysis of repeatability and reproducibility. Like any measurement system, the accuracy and accuracy of the database must be understood before the information is used (or at least during use) to make decisions. At first glance, it appears that the apparent starting point begins with an analysis of the attribute (or attribute-Gage-R-R). That may not be a very good idea. Unlike a continuous measurement value, which cannot be accurate (on average), any lack of precision in an attribute measurement system inevitably leads to accuracy problems. If the error coder is not clear or undecided on how to encode a defect, different codes are assigned to several defects of the same type, making the database imprecise. In fact, the vagueness of an attribute measurement system is an important factor in inaccuracies. If the test is planned and designed effectively, it can reveal enough information about the causes of the accuracy problems to justify a decision not to use attribute analysis at all. In cases where the trial does not provide sufficient information, the analysis of the attribute agreement allows for a more detailed review to inform the introduction of training changes and error correction in the measurement system. Once it is established that the bug tracking system is a system for measuring attributes, the next step is to examine the concepts of accuracy and accuracy that relate to the situation. First, it helps to understand that accuracy and precision are terms borrowed from the world of continuous (or variable) gags.

For example, it is desirable that the speedometer in a car can carefully read the right speed over a range of speeds (z.B. 25 mph, 40 mph, 55 mph and 70 mph), regardless of the drive.